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National Patient Safety Agency
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Study shows NHS Hospitals are cleaner

10 July 2008

 

Standards of cleanliness and food in NHS hospitals throughout England have improved according to the annual Patient Environment Action Team (PEAT) data for 2008, published by the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) today.

 

Patient Environment Action Teams were established in 2000 to assess NHS hospitals.  Under the programme, every hospital in England with more than ten beds is assessed annually and given a rating of excellent, good, acceptable, poor or unacceptable.

 

The teams inspect standards across a range of patient services including of food, cleanliness, infection control, and patient environment (bathroom areas, décor, lighting, floors and patient access) to give the hospital an overall rating.  This year’s results show a significant improvement in standards with 98.5% of trusts scoring acceptable or above for their patient environments and 99.5% of trusts scoring acceptable or above for standards of hospital food.

 

Each site is inspected by a Patient Environment Action Team which consists of teams of NHS staff, including nurses, matrons, doctors, catering and domestic service managers, executive and non-executive directors, dieticians and estates directors.  They also include patients, patient representatives and members of the public.

 

Martin Fletcher, Chief Executive of the NPSA said:

 

“This year’s PEAT results show a welcome improvement on the environmental standards of NHS hospitals across the country.

 

“The PEAT results are clearly a tribute to the ongoing hard work of the NHS staff involved. I hope they will also encourage all hospitals to keep on improving their standards for the future.

 

“Both NHS trusts and the public can now view how their local hospitals have performed on making their facilities clean, comfortable and safer for patients.”

 

The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) oversees the management of the PEAT programme. As with the approach taken by the Healthcare Commission, the PEAT programme is an entirely self-assessed system and sites are measured on their food, as well as their “patient environment”, which covers their:

 

  • Specific cleanliness and toilet and bathroom cleanliness

  • Infection control

  • Environment (wards, rooms, waiting and reception areas, stairwells, lifts, corridors and other public areas)

  • Access and external areas.

 

NHS hospitals throughout England have already had access to their individual scores for 2008; however from today they will able to compare this year’s score with other local hospitals.

 

2008 PEAT results available here

 

 


 

 

 

Notes for editors:

 

Media enquiries to Paul Cooney in the NPSA Communications Department on 020 7927 9351 or paul.cooney@npsa.nhs.uk.

 

National average figures for 2005 – 2008 (figures rounded to one decimal place):

 

Patient Environment

 

 

Excellent

Good

Acceptable

Poor

Unacceptable

2005

10.3%

44.8%

40.1%

4.6%

0.2%

2006

14.2%

49.8%

31.1%

4.8%

0.2%

2007

14.3%

48.9%

34.8%

1.6%

0.5%

2008

19.1%

55.5%

23.9%

1.4%

0.1%

 

Hospital Food

 

 

Excellent

Good

Acceptable

Poor

Unacceptable

2005

32.4%

51.5%

14.8%

1.3%

0.0%

2006

33.8%

57.8%

8.3%

0.008%

0.0%

2007

46.5%

48.5%

4.5%

0.5%

0.0%

2008

54.0%

39.7%

5.0%

0.5%

0.0%

 

From 2001-2003, healthcare facilities were awarded a traffic colour to denote Good (Green), Acceptable (Amber), or Poor (Red) performance.

 

The PEAT programme was established in 2000 and the National Patient Safety Agency has overseen the management of this since 2006.

 

The PEAT programme also assesses all sites on their “privacy and dignity”. However this is passed directly to the Department of Health and is not handled by the NPSA at any stage.

 

The National Patient Safety Agency encompasses the National Research Ethics Service, Patient Safety Division and the National Clinical Assessment Service. Our vision is to lead and contribute to improved, safe patient care by informing, supporting and influencing healthcare individuals and organisations. Each division works within its sphere of expertise to improve patient outcomes.